Ruth's Blog

Easy Apple Puree | Baby’s First Foods

‘Tis the season for apples, that is for sure!  Apple puree is a terrifc choice for a first food as part of a healthy Super Baby Food Diet.  Apples are so nutritious.  You can feed apple puree to baby starting from 6 months.

Apples are steeped in vitamins and minerals……They don’t say “an apple a day, keeps the doctor away” for no reason!

Livestrong.com tells us that apples are a good source of vitamin C.  Our  bodies “needs vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, to synthesize collagen, a component of tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, skin and cartilage. Vitamin C also helps repair and maintain bones and teeth and helps wounds to heal. As an antioxidant, vitamin C protects DNA by reducing the harmful effects of free radicals, which are unstable molecules that help age the body and contribute to the development of diseases.” All pretty good reasons to eat apples, right?

To begin making apple puree for your baby choose from these sweeter apples:

Golden delicious, Red Delicious, Braeburn and/or Gala apples.  Honeycrisp and empire work, too!

Select Apples that are smooth without bruises and very firm…no yielding when pressed!

Remember that apples are part of the “dirty dozen” (pesticide risk) according to the EWG so an organic choice is best!

 

Apple Puree for Baby

  • Wash and Peel 2 Medium sized apples
  • Core and chopped apple into pieces
  • Place apple pieces in covered pot with 1 1/2 tablespoons of water
  • Cook over low-medium heat for 4 minutes
  • Pour apple pieces and water / juice into blender to Puree

You can freeze puree using the Food Cube Method for up to two months.

Serve apple puree alone as part of a super meal or add to super porridge!

What is your favorite way to pair apple puree with other foods for your baby? Have you ever tried to pair apple puree with a vegetable?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Desiccated Liver Powder as Nutritional Supplement for Baby

In a recent comment a mom asks about dessicated liver.  We thought it was a great question and that we would ask Ruth for her thoughts…

The mom asks:

I really love your book. Thanks for such a great work.

I’d like to start using desiccated liver powder for my 8 months old daughter but I cant find the powder version of it,  all I can find is the tablet version.

Can you recommend a brand/company who makes powder form of the desiccated liver?

Thnx.

Ruth Says:

Desiccated liver is a powdered nutritional supplement made from dried liver.  It is high in vitamin B12 (a nutrient sometimes claimed to be lacking in vegetarian diets) and other B vitamins. You can introduce desiccated liver to your baby beginning at about 8 months.  Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon to your baby’s  Super Porridge daily or several times a week to make up for whatever you feel your baby would be missing in a meatless diet.

I recommend the Now brand. Please go light on the liver powder so baby does not get too much iron.  The nutrition section of Super Baby Food discusses the daily recommended amounts of iron.  The iron is “heme” iron and is very well-absorbed, unlike iron from plants.  You can also buy the tablets and crush them by putting them in ziploc bag and crushing with a spoon

Check back at the Super Baby Food Blog for more information for feeding your baby the very best!

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Tips For the Exclusively Breastfed Baby: Getting Ready!

Moms are talking about:

How to get the exclusively breastfed baby ready for solid foods:

Ruth Says:

Thanks for using my book. It’s great that you are breastfeeding!  One thing you can do right now to make your little sweetie more accepting to new flavors is to eat a variety of flavors yourself.  The flavors will be in your breastmilk, so eat foods like cabbage, broccoli, sweet potatoes, whole grains and beans, and all the super foods that are loaded with nutrition.

There are a few chapters of Super Baby Food that you should read in their entirety before you start feeding solid foods.  The chapters about food safety and setting up the feeding area, as it says on page v in the front of the book.  You may want to ask your pediatrician for a vitamin supplement for her – one with vitamin D and iron and perhaps zinc.  These are important nutrients that your baby will start needing at around 6 months.

Enjoy!

Ruth

To read more about starting solids, try the new Super Baby Food ebook available on Super Baby Food.com.

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Cottage Cheese For Babies: How-to Feed Dairy Baby Food

Moms Are Talking About…

Feeding Cottage Cheese to Your Baby

Cottage Cheese baby foodThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends dairy products (yogurt, natural cheeses, cottage cheese) made from whole milk because babies need fats.  As for all new foods, use the four-day wait rule.  Keep in mind that these fats are the saturated kind, which should be minimized in older children’s diets.  So when your baby becomes a toddler at age 1-2 years, you may want to switch to low-fat or non-fat dairy products, depending on which your professional baby care provider recommends and the age to switch.  I recommend buying only ORGANIC dairy products, which are from cows that are not treated with antibiotics or BVG (bovine growth hormone) and graze on grass with no pesticides.

Although it’s OK to give your child dairy products like yogurt and cheese made from cow’s milk, do not feed cow’s milk itself to your baby until s/he is one year old.  Until one year, give your baby breastmilk or formula and no cow’s milk, because cow’s milk protein is different from the protein in breastmilk/formula.  Be sure all dairy and cheeses you give to your baby are pasteurized and not made from raw milk.  Start your baby on dairy only if there are no milk allergies in the family–consult your pediatrician as to whether to introduce dairy to your baby.  In fact, if there are ANY allergies in the family (food allergies, asthma, pollen, etc.) , especially in the immediate family, discuss them thoroughly with your baby care povider.

By the way, if you haven’t given yogurt or kefir to your baby yet, you may wish to choose these dairy products over cottage cheese because they have the healthy bacteria so necessary for your baby’s digestive and immune systems.

For more information on dairy products and your baby, check Super Baby Food or right back her at the Super Baby Food Blog.

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What To Do When Your Baby Won’t Eat a Certain Food?

What to do when your baby won’t eat a certain food?

It’s a worry for parents.  The first thing to remember is not to push it.  Put the food away and try again in a few weeks. Sometimes your baby will not eat something that is sweet and tastes good to you.  With my baby, it was applesauce.  I was surprised (but not upset!) that he simply would not eat it. A few months later, he began eating it with gusto and has loved it ever since.

If you’re afraid a toddler will not like a particularly healthy new food, such as kale, use a little reverse psychology to get her interested.  Don’t give her any and eat it in front of her.  She will want some.  Be hesitant, but agree to give her some. If you’re lucky, she will love to eat it because it makes her feel like a big girl who fits in with the rest of the adults in the family.

Remember, too, babies will almost always make a face when offered a new food, especially if it has a strong flavor.  Do not go by her facial expression.  Offer her another spoonful and if her little mouth opens to accept a refill, continue feeding!

For more baby food tips check out Super Baby Food or right back her at the Super Baby Food blog!

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Super Baby Food Loves This Post on How To Make Fruit Leather

Super Baby Food Loves This Post on How To Make Fruit Leather

Tricia, a blogger at How Sweeter It Is, is a fan of Super Baby Food.  We love that.  We also love that she took the time to describe the making of fruit leather as mentioned in Super Baby Food, with pictures, in a scrumptious blog post on her site for mom’s benefit.  Keep up the good work, Tricia.

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Moms Are Talking About: Feeding Radishes to Their Baby

A mom had a question on the Super Baby Food Facebook Page about feeding a baby radishes!

Are radishes OK to feed a baby?

Here is what Ruth had to say:

Radishes technically are OK to give to a 9 month old, but I would suggest giving very little and very well diced – use a garlic press and knife to get it into the smallest pieces.  Radishes might cause stomach upset and may be difficult for your baby’s immature system to digest.  Try just a little tiny pea-sized bit and wait a day or so to see if your baby has any reaction.

Use only organic radishes and herbs and spices.

You can add herbs and spices anytime after 6 months, but I would first start with spices that are not hot.  Try a little cinnamon, or ginger first, then move on to turmeric (a SUPER spice loaded with good stuff), cumin, and others.  Stay away from the hot ones, such as cayenne pepper and garlic, for a while.  Introduce in very small quantities and, as always for new foods, use the 4-day wait rule.  Spices are loaded with antioxidants and are super foods, however, do NOT use imported spices, as they may have heavy metals (lead, mercury) in them.

I like the Frontier brand.  All their spices are organic and you can find them at the natural foods store or large grocery stores like Wegman’s.
http://www.frontiercoop.com/products/spices.php

TIP: If your mouth gets too hot from hot or peppery spices, cool it down with milk, which cools better than water or juice.

Thanks for writing!

Does anyone else have a question regarding a vegetable?  Send them to Ruth!

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How to Pick and Prepare Carrots for Your Super Baby, the Super Baby Food Way

Choosing, Picking, and Preparing Carrots to Feed your Baby

Carrots are loaded with beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A that is not toxic, even in large doses.  Your baby should get a vitamin A veggie every day!  Here are some details for feeding you baby carrots:

Age: Baby must be at least 7 months old for cooked carrots, 10 months for finely grated raw carrots.

Choosing: Carrots should be firm, and not pale.  The smaller the carrot, the sweeter the carrot.

Storing: Carrots need cold temperature and high humidity.  Store in the refrigerator in plastic bag with holes.  When properly stored, carrots retain their nutrients for up to two weeks.

Preparation for cooking: Nutrients are most concentrated in the peels of carrots and just below.  You don’t have to peel or scrape young or small carrots if you give them a good scrubbing with a vegetable brush.  Older, bigger carrots are probably better peeled.

Steaming: Steam whole carrots 15 minutes, carrot slices about 10 minutes.

Baking: Large carrots can be baked in the oven.  Scrub them and leave whole and unpeeled. Bake at 350 for 30 to 40 minutes.

Freezing: Freeze pureed carrots using the food cube method for up to 2 months.

For tips on preparing and feeding more vegetables, check out Super Baby Food book or check right back here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

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Vitamin Supplements for Your Super Baby

The number one rule when considering supplements for your baby is to discuss it with your pediatrician.  Between the two of you, you can determine the diet your baby has now and what might need to be supplemented.  With that in mind, here is some general information that you can use to start to talk about supplements for your baby.

Vitamin supplements are called supplements because they are meant to do just that – “supplement” a baby’s good diet.  Vitamin supplements are terrific because even a good diet can be lacking in nutrients due to improper storage of foods, too-early harvesting, and the lack of nutrients in our country’s depleted soils from poor farming methods.

Exclusively breast-fed babies are often prescribed a supplement containing vitamin D.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends this because breast milk may not have enough of this nutrient, which is produced by sunlight on skin.  Some, however, feel the need for Vitamin D as a supplement to a breastfeeding baby may not be necessary.  You can read that point of view here on Homemade Baby Food Recipes.com.

Once you discuss supplements with your pediatrician, be sure to give your baby his vitamin supplement with her meals, not on an empty stomach.  Vitamins work with food to help with chemical reactions in the body.  For many babies the method will be to exclusively breast feed your baby until 6 months old and add vitamin D, and possibly iron drops (we’ll talk more about iron in the next post).  Bottle fed babies will not need Vitamin D as a supplement as it is provided in formula.

In the next post we’ll discuss Iron and Fluoride as supplements.  For even more information on nutritional supplements including a terrific appendix of every vitamin known to man defined with the  nutritional needs of your baby by age check out the Super Baby Food book or check back here at the Super Baby Food Blog!

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Your Baby’s Signs of Readiness For Solid Foods, Part II

In the last blog post, we listed some signs of readiness for solid foods that you and your pediatrician will look for to determine whether your baby is ready for solid foods.  Remember to discuss these signs with your pediatrician to make the determination whether you baby is ready for solid foods.

Here are more signs of readiness:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby is drinking at least 32-40 ounces of formula per 24 hours and still wants more.
  • Baby is breast feeding at least 8-10 times per 24 hours, empties both breasts at each feeding, and still wants more.
  • The time between feedings becomes shorter and shorter over a period of several days.
  • Baby can bring an object in her hand directly to her mouth.
  • Baby shows interest in others eating around her.
  • Baby becomes fussy in the middle of the night, whereas before she slept through with no problem.

For these and other great tips for feeding baby check out the book, Super Baby Food. For immediate information, try the Super Baby Food app, free for a limited time.

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